About Cannabis News Journal

At Cannabis News Journal, we join Americans For Safe Access, in emphasizing the importance for all people within OUR medical cannabis community to know THEY are the power; the government, legislators & policy makers are lead to us and We The People have the power to change the laws and government – people in it, policy being written, and overturning rules & regulations that disrupt safe access to our medicine. Not one state’s medical cannabis law is perfect, they are working pieces of democracy and this is where WE can establish patient community lead policy in New Mexico and many many other states. We have the science, the research, the knowledge – the information the policy makers don’t have and we need to get it in front of legislators and state government officials.

Cannabis New Journal strives to Unite, Network, Grow, Advocate, Empower, Educate, and Improve the quality of medical cannabis community. Cannabis News Journal is here for those who want to be more proactive in their healthcare decisions, and want to explore the benefits by integrating medical cannabis into their own healthcare plan. The purpose of Cannabis News Journal is to objectively educate the public, not just sell a product.

Be aware of sites, organizations, and practitioners whose main interest is in marketing products. Cannabis News Journal will only provide links and references to reliable, authoritative sources. The internet is a rich source of cannabis information, but it is also an easy channel for spreading alleged news, myths, unproven products and findings.

A great grassroots movement brings together vibrant activists in an environment of mutual respect, shared responsibility, and constructive political activism and creates a space for new advocates to plug into the movement. The ideal grassroots movement is networked into the larger community and is a constructive and inclusive voice for patients, future patients, caregivers and providers of the medical cannabis community. The best grassroots movements combine the art of conversation with skilled activism. They are considered by elected officials to be a principled voice and smart resource for community leaders who are interested in addressing the question of medical cannabis.

We have all almost certainly heard the phrase “medical cannabis movement,” but have you stopped to consider what a movement is? And what it means to be a part of a “grassroots” movement? In terms of community organizing, a movement is simply a group of people who come together consciously, at their own cost, to accomplish a goal. The definition we use at Cannabis News Journal, is that a movement is a group of people who come together to change outdated laws concerning medical cannabis, while providing support for those who are harmed by existing law.

Some people say that a movement is not a movement until others outside the group know it exists. This is a good point. The goal of organizing is to change minds and laws, so grassroots movements must reach out to the broader public. But all movements start small and local.

It is up to all of us and our like-minded neighbors, friends and patients we know- to plant the seeds and grow the movement locally!   

Movement leaders do not tell the grassroots members what to do or believe. Instead, they listen to the community and look to the members for solutions.

After all, the medical cannabis movement exists to get medicine to patients and support the victims of bad laws. A clear focus on that mission helps us set priorities and make decisions not governed by politics, public relations, or economics.  As custodians to our grassroots movement, Cannabis News Journal can help provide you with the tools you need to build the powerful grassroots base that will foster real change as our group moves forward. We all have a role in being sure that this grassroots movement grows, stays true to its roots, and acts like a mature social change movement. Dialogue and discussion are necessary and we need to be able to listen non-defensively and communicate respectfully if we are going to achieve the goals we want for our medical cannabis program and future legalization legislation policies.

Let’s Grow OUR Medical Cannabis Community.

 

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Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Recommendations Empower Medical Cannabis Community

 

MEDIA RELEASE -Friday, April 7th 2017

LECUA_thc_cbd.png


The LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico has provided the New Mexico Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program 20 Petitions for the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board to review and address at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017.  
Petitions Authored & Organized By Jason Barker
– Medical Cannabis Patient & Organizer with the
LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico

All Petitions Can Be Viewed Online At:
LECUA NM MCP MCAB Petitions:
http://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/


These Petitions Reviewed By The MCAB, Isn’t A Medical Cannabis Case…
It’s A HealTHCare Case.


Petition Action Vote (Y/N)
2017‐012 Add autism as a condition Recommended to add to MCP 3-0
2017‐013 Add anxiety as a condition Recommended to add to MCP 3-1
2017‐014 Add depression Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017‐015 Add Concussions, CTE and TBI as conditions Tabled
2017‐016 Add diabetes 0-4
2017‐017 Add Dystonia Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017‐018 Add Migraines Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017‐019 Add Rheumatoid Arthritis Recommended to expand terms 4-0
(Petition 2017-019 (Title Was TO BE) : Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) To Include:
There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis and related diseases. The most common types include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), fibromyalgia and gout.   *Printing Error at copy place used wrong cover page…)

2017‐020 Sleep Disorders Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017‐021 Substance Abuse Disorder Tabled
2017‐022 Patient Run Collectives Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017-005 Change/increase possession limit to 16 oz Recommended to add to MCP 4-0
2017-009 Removal of Max THC Content Recommended Removal of Cap   4-0


Per legal counsel’s input petitions numbered 1,2,3,4, and 11 would require statutory changes or are not covered under the duties of the MCAB and will not be discussed.
2017-001 Add Veteran Status as a Qualifying Condition
2017-002 Allow any chronic condition to be a qualifying condition
2017-003 Change LECUA to give MCAB more authority (increase membership)
2017-004 Change LECUA to make renewals every three years
2017-011 Add definition of Medical Treatment definition to LECUA and add Adequate
Supply
Petitions 6, 8,10 and 23 concern the licensed producers and would require statutory changes and are not covered under the duties of the MCAB and will not be discussed.
2017-006 Allow PPL holders to use manufacturers for conversion of product.
2017-008 Remove CBD plants from producer plant count (This is a regulatory change).
2017-010 Increase plants for licensed producers (This is a regulatory change).
2017-023 Develop MCP education and research components


All Petitions Can Be Viewed Online At:
LECUA NM MCP MCAB Petitions
http://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/



Petitions provided to the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board (MCAB)


  1. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply: Limit of 230 Units per 3 months changed/increased


   II. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Potency Cap of THC for  Concentrates Removed


   III. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Personal Production License Plant Increase & PPL Collectives  
   IV. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply: LNPP Plant Count Increase


   V. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Remove CBD from Plant Count


   VI. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Anxiety Disorder


   VII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Autism Spectrum Disorder


    VIII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Concussion, CTE, & TBI


    IX. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Depression (clinical)


    X. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Diabetes Mellitus


    XI. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Dystonia
    XII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Migraine
    XIII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Rheumatoid Arthritis


    XIV. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Substance Abuse Disorder
    XV. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Exception To Qualifying Conditions To Add:
            A Person’s Status as a Veteran


    XVI. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Increase MCAB membership
            (Medical cannabis advisory board responsibilities and duties)


   XVII. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; ADA language for Section 8 of LECUA
            (Medical cannabis registry identification cards)    


  XVIII. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Medical Cannabis 3 yr registry
            identification cards
Presumptive eligibility and once a patient is accepted into the program,  registry and PPL identification cards should be set at a 3 renewal basis. The Department can then do yearly address verification by mail all while maintaining safe access to medical cannabis.


  XIX. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Medical Cannabis Program Research
            & Education Established


  XX. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Insomnia / Sleep Disorders

Next MCAB Meeting Tentative Date of Nov 3rd 2017 at 10am

Lets Grow OUR Medical Cannabis Community

New Mexico Medical Cannabis Community


The LECUA Medical Cannabis Community has provided the New Mexico Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program 20 Petitions for the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board to review and address at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017.  New Mexico has been providing Medical Cannabis to patients in the State since 1978; It’s our goal for New Mexico to return as the leader of safe and accessible medical cannabis for all patients in the State and be a leader for this in the Southwest,  amongst the Top 3 Programs Nationally, and then be a Top 10 Medical Program World Wide.


10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017 – Meeting Location: Harold Runnels Building
1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-827-2613 Phone


Medical Cannabis Community Comments and Public Comments: Please take the time to look over the Petitions before the MCAB. We know how they MCP and medical cannabis is improving the quality of our lives, now let’s expand this to more and more New Mexicans. There are several ways your voice can be heard; attending the meeting for public comment, providing written comment at the meeting, in the mail, and email. Please also considering leaving comments on the website the Petitions are posted on.


Public meetings are a chance to articulate our message and show our strength to state officials,  elected officials, and the community at large…


Public comment period: The advisory board may provide for a public comment period. Public comment may be by written comment, verbal or both.
Written comment: Any individual or association of individuals may submit written comment to the advisory board either in opposition or support of the inclusion of a medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the existing list of debilitating medical conditions contained under the act. All written comment shall adhere to the requirements of Subsection F of this section.


Mailing Address
Department of Health
Medical Cannabis Program
PO Box 26110
Santa Fe, NM, 87502-6110
Email Address
medical.cannabis@state.nm.us


*Share Your Comments and Petitions you support or oppose with Your State Legislator & Invite Your State Legislator TO ATTEND The MCAB Hearing: Find My Legislator https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator




Read the Lynn And Erin Compassionate Use Act Here

Daily Lobo



Petitions Authored & Organized By Jason Barker

– Medical Cannabis Patient & Organizer with the
LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico
Email Address
LECUAPatientsCoalitionNM@gmail.com




All Petitions Can Be Viewed Online At:
LECUA NM MCP MCAB Petitions
http://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/


Petitions provided to the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board (MCAB)


  1. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply: Limit of 230 Units per 3 months changed/increased
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


   II. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Potency Cap of THC for  Concentrates Removed
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


   III. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Personal Production License Plant Increase & PPL Collectives  
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*
   IV. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply: LNPP Plant Count Increase
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


   V. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Adequate Supply:
            Remove CBD from Plant Count
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


   VI. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Anxiety Disorder
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


   VII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Autism Spectrum Disorder
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


    VIII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Concussion, CTE, & TBI
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


    IX. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Depression (clinical)
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


    X. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Diabetes Mellitus
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


    XI. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Dystonia
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*
    XII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Migraine
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*
    XIII. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) To Include:
There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis and related diseases. The most common types include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), fibromyalgia and gout.
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


    XIV. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Substance Abuse Disorder
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*
    XV. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Exception To Qualifying Conditions To Add:
            A Person’s Status as a Veteran
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


    XVI. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Increase MCAB membership
            (Medical cannabis advisory board responsibilities and duties)
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


   XVII. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; ADA language for Section 8 of LECUA
            (Medical cannabis registry identification cards)    
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


  XVIII. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Medical Cannabis 3 yr registry
            identification cards
Presumptive eligibility and once a patient is accepted into the program,  registry and PPL identification cards should be set at a 3 renewal basis. The Department can then do yearly address verification by mail all while maintaining safe access to medical cannabis.
*(After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017. )* Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st 2017  *Interesting how a Petition is reviewed and denied (behind close doors) before being heard at the Public meeting…


  XIX. Petition Pertaining to the Medical Treatment; Medical Cannabis Program Research
            & Education Established
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


  XX. Petition Pertaining to the Condition to Add: Insomnia / Sleep Disorders
*Will Be Heard at the MCAB Hearing 10am – Friday – April 7th – 2017*


7.34.2.10 ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC HEARING PROCEDURES:
               A.Public hearing requirement: The advisory board shall convene by public hearing at least twice per year to accept and review petitions requesting the inclusion of medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the list of debilitating medical conditions. Any meeting consisting of a quorum of the advisory board members held for the purpose of evaluating, discussing or otherwise formulating specific opinions concerning the recommendation of a petition filed pursuant to this rule, shall be declared a public hearing open to the public at all times, unless a portion of the hearing is closed to protect information made confidential by applicable state or federal laws.  A petitioner or his or her representative may request to close a portion of the hearing to protect the disclosure of confidential information by submitting their request in writing and having that request delivered to medical cannabis program staff at least 48 hours prior to the hearing.
               B. Location of the public hearing: Unless otherwise ordered by the advisory board, the public hearing shall be in held in New Mexico at a location sufficient to accommodate the anticipated audience.
               C.Public hearing notice: The medical cannabis program manager or designee shall, upon direction from the advisory board chairperson, prepare a notice of public hearing setting forth the date, time and location of the hearing, a brief description of the petitions received, and information on the requirements for public comment or statement of intent to present technical evidence, and no later than 30 days prior to the hearing date, send copies, with requests for publication, to at least one newspaper of general circulation.  The program manager or designee may further issue notice of the hearing by any other means the department determines to be acceptable to provide notice to the public.
               D.Public hearing agenda: The department shall make available an agenda containing a list of specific items to be discussed or information on how the public may obtain a copy of such agenda.
               E. Postponement of hearing: Request for postponement of a public hearing will be granted, by the advisory board for good cause shown.
               F. Statement of intent to present technical evidence: Any individual or association of individuals who wish to present technical evidence at the hearing shall, no later than 15 days prior to the date of the hearing, file a statement of intent. The statement of intent to present technical evidence shall include:
   (1) the name of the person filing the statement;
   (2)indication of whether the person filing the statement supports or opposes the petition at issue;
   (3) the name of each witness;
   (4) an estimate of the length of the direct testimony of each witness;
   (5) a list of exhibits, if any, to be offered into evidence at the hearing; and
   (6) a summary or outline of the anticipated direct testimony of each witness.
               G.Ex parte discussions: At no time after the initiation and before the conclusion of the petition process under this part, shall the department, or any other party, interested participant or their representatives discuss ex parte the merits of the petitions with any advisory board member.
               H.Public hearing process: The advisory board chairperson shall conduct the public hearing so as to provide a reasonable opportunity for all interested persons to be heard without making the hearing unreasonably lengthy or cumbersome or burdening the record with unnecessary repetition.
                            (1)A quorum of the advisory board shall consist of three voting members.
                            (2)The advisory board chairperson/ alternate shall convene each public hearing by:
                                               (a)           introduction of the advisory board members;
                                               (b)           statutory authority of the board;
                                               (c)           statement of the public hearing agenda; and
                                               (d)           recognition of the petitioner.
                               (3)Petitioner comment period. The petitioner or by representative may present evidence to the advisory board. The advisory board shall only consider findings of fact or scientific conclusions of medical evidence presented by the petitioner or by representative to the advisory board prior to or contemporaneously with the public hearing.
                               (4)Public comment period: The advisory board may provide for a public comment period. Public comment may be by written comment, verbal or both.
                                               (a) Written comment: Any individual or association of individuals may submit written comment to the advisory board either in opposition or support of the inclusion of a medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the existing list of debilitating medical conditions contained under the act. All written comment shall adhere to the requirements of Subsection F of this section.


Appendix A: via Gmail
“Dear Mr. Barker,
After review and consideration the medical advisory board for the Medical Cannabis Program has decided your petition(s) either requires a legislative change or these petitions do not fall under the responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board. As a result the petitions will not be heard at the Advisory Board meeting being held on April 07, 2017.
The following petitions will not be heard at the April 07, 2017 meeting:
Petition 2017-001 Petition to add being a veteran as a qualifying condition. Change to LECUA
Petition 2017-002 Change definition of debilitating medical condition in LECUA
Petition 2017-003 Change responsibilities of the Medical Advisory Board
Petition 2017-004 Change registration to be every three years, change in LECUA
Petition 2017-008 Remove CBD plants from producer plant count
Petition 2017-010 Increase LNPP plant count
Petition 2017-012 Add Autism as a condition”

*Informed of that via email on Fr. Mar. 31st -JB



BOYCOTT ULTRA HEALTH!


DO NOT SUPPORT ULTRA HEALTH WHO JEOPARDIZES THE MEDICAL CANNABIS PROGRAM & COMMUNITY BY RECKLESS ACTIONS OF SELF-PROMOTION!

Lynn & Erin Compassionate Use Act Patient’s Coalition of New Mexico ~ A GrassRoots Movement!
UNITE-NETWORK-GROW-INFORM-KNOW-EDUCATE-ACTIVISM-VOTE-HEALTH-WELLNESS

(All Rights Reserved 04/20/2016

Advocacy


What is Advocacy?

Advocacy is speaking in support of a person or an issue
Advocacy supports human rights
Advocacy is NOT case work, support work, self interest, mediation, conciliation,  counseling, or a means to achieving an individuals agenda and/or receiving a personal or financial benefit.

What is Inclusion?

Inclusion is full participation in the community
What is Transparency?


Transparency, as used in science, engineering, business, the humanities and in other social contexts, implies openness, communication, and accountability. Transparency is operating in such a way that it is easy for others to see what actions are performed.

Advocacy is having someone or group to stand beside you and with you if you think something is unfair or that someone is treating you badly and you would like to do something to change it.
An Advocate will:

• Listen to you
• Identify the issues they can help with
• Provide you with information
• Stand beside you so that you can be heard
• Assist you to solve your issues yourself
• Refer you to other organisations if necessary



There are three components to a successful facilitated advocacy plan:

Structure: Create a structure that establishes an ongoing advocacy program for health care policy relating to our medical cannabis program.

An organization’s advocacy operations should include; specific goals, accountability, inclusion of its community and action plans. .

Relationships: Develop ongoing relationships with critical policymakers and key community leaders.

Action: Put your structure and relationships to work.

What is Exclusive? (per merriam-webster)
1a :  excluding or having power to exclude
b :  limiting or limited to possession, control, or use by a single individual or group
2a :  excluding others from participation
b :  snobbishly aloof
3a :  accepting or soliciting only a socially restricted patronage (as of the upper class)
b :  stylish, fashionable
c :  restricted in distribution, use, or appeal because of expense


“Exclusive” originated in the late 15th century (as a noun denoting something that excludes or causes exclusion): from medieval Latin: exclusivus, and from Latin: excludere ‘shut out’


“Advocacy” originated from late Middle English: via Old French from medieval Latin: advocatia, and from advocare ‘summon, call to one’s aid’


When Advocacy & Inclusion are combined and put into Action = >  the results reach the Entire Community.

Teen Drug Abuse Decline Continues

The 2016 Monitoring the Future annual survey results has been released from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study reflects changing teen behaviors and choices about drugs in a social media-infused world. The results show a continued long-term decline in the use of many illicit substances, including cannabis as well as alcohol, tobacco, and misuse of some prescription medications. The survey measures drug use and attitudes among eighth, 10th, and 12th graders, and is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse is part of the NIH.

 

The MTF survey, the only large-scale federal youth survey on substance use that releases findings the same year the data is collected and has been conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor since 1975.  Findings from the survey indicate that past year use of any illicit drug is down from recent peaks in all three grade levels.

What the study shows is how cannabis use in the past month among eighth graders dropped significantly in 2016 to 5.4 percent, from 6.5 percent in 2015. Daily use among eighth graders dropped in 2016 to 0.7 percent from 1.1 percent in 2015. However, among high school seniors, 22.5 percent report past month marijuana use and 6 percent report daily use; both measures remained relatively stable from last year. Similarly, rates of cannabis use in the past year among 10th graders also remained stable compared to 2015, but are at their lowest levels in over two decades.

 

National surveys have continued to show that teen cannabis use rates are falling across the country. Federal data released late last year showed that teen use rates in Colorado and Washington were essentially flat, they covered 2014, the first year commercial cannabis was available in those states. Rates of cannabis use among Colorado’s teenagers are essentially unchanged in the years since the state’s voters legalized cannabis in 2012, new survey data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment shows this. The survey was based on a random sample of 17,000 middle and high school students in Colorado. Levels of teen use in Colorado have not increased since it ended cannabis prohibition, and they are lower than the national average.
California where medical cannabis has been legal for many years in an unregulated environment and now has been legalized with the passage of AUMA , cannabis use there in teens has also remained less prevalent than the years before the cannabis had been made legal according to results from the 13th Biennial California Student Survey.
Studies like these continue to debunk the theory that making medical cannabis legal and the legalization of commercial cannabis for adults will result in more teen use.  Another study published in The Lancet Psychiatry showed no significant difference in adolescent cannabis use in the states with medical cannabis laws. This exhaustive study using over 24 years of data from over a million teenagers in 48 states found no evidence that legalized medical cannabis led to teenagers using cannabis more. Cannabis has been the consistently most available drug since 1975 where 81% of teens said they could get it, moving up to 90% now. However, being about to get it and wanting to use it are two different things.  In fact, states with legal cannabis are seeing a decline in all types of illicit drugs abused by teens – maybe this is a new component to the entourage effect.

 

Roundhouse Update



Tuesday, March 14th, at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, legislators will be busy with several bills that could affect the medical cannabis program:  SB-177 “Medical Marijuana Changes” on the agenda for the House Judiciary Committee,  SB-258 “Decrease Marijuana Penalties” in House Consumer & Public Affairs Committee, and HB-527 “Medical Marijuana Changes in Senate Public Affairs Committee.


In the Call For Action, this article will have details on all these bills on the agenda for today and how you can have your voice heard by emailing, calling the Roundhouse, and calling your legislator. In this Call For Action, having your voice heard by doing both, emailing and calling legislators will provide a stronger impact on getting the message across.


SB-177 “Medical Marijuana Changes” in House Judiciary Committee at 8 am in Room 307


Committee Members

Title
Name
Party
Role
Representative
D
Chair
Representative
D
Vice Chair
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member




SB-258 “Decrease Marijuana Penalties” in House Consumer & Public Affairs Committee Tuesday, March 14, 2017  –  1:30 pm  –  Room 309

Committee Members
Title
Name
Party
Role
Representative
D
Chair
Representative
D
Vice Chair
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member




HB-527 “Medical Marijuana Changes in Senate Public Affairs Committee, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 –  Room 321


Committee Members

Title
Name
Party
Role
Senator
D
Chair
Senator
D
Vice Chair
Senator
R
Member
Senator
R
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
R
Ranking Member



Call For Action: Call and email your Senator and House of Representative member – call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard.

Senate Chamber main phone 505-986-4714 and general email: senate@nmlegis.gov

House of Representatives main phone number 505-986-4751 and general email: house@nmlegis.gov

Life Saving Legislation

“Medical Marijuana Changes”
State Senator Cisco McSorley has been very busy this session with his sponsored legislation on medical cannabis and hemp at the roundhouse, Senate Bill 6: “Industrial Research Rules” and  Senate Bill 177, “Medical Marijuana Changes”. Cisco McSorley has been a member of the New Mexico State Senate, representing district 16, of Bernalillo county. McSorley was first elected to the chamber in 1996. Senator McSorley served in the New Mexico State House of Representatives from 1985 to 1997. Senator McSorley earned his B.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1974 and his J.D. from the University of New Mexico, School of Law, in 1979. His professional experience includes working as a Teacher in Quito, Ecuador, from 1974 to 1976, and as a lawyer since 1979. The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, 2007, the current medical cannabis law passed under Governor Bill Richardson and was lead in the state legislature by Senator Cisco McSorley.
Senate Bill 177, “Medical Marijuana Changes, passed on February 13th 2017, in the Senate Chamber and it was introduced in the House Chamber and since has been referred to the House Health and Human Service Committee. Senate Bill 177 takes 14 current conditions from the current program rules and adds them into the definition of “debilitating medical condition”, part of the program law for a person to obtain a medical cannabis registry identification card.
The bill wanted to add ‘status as a veteran’ as an automatic qualification for obtaining a registration identification card. Veteran status was removed as a “qualifying condition” on a senate floor amendment by request of a former Rear Admiral Payne, a attorney and a New Mexico State Senator who thought is was giving Veterans access to “recreational pot”. It’s concerning to see one veteran and lawmaker make a decision on something the lawmaker doesn’t understand, that affects thousands of Veterans in New Mexico.
Patients are allowed to have 5 oz of medical cannabis every two weeks under SB-177, and it was said in a Senate Committee by Drug Policy Alliance, that the increase to 5 oz every two weeks helps patients in rural areas because those patients would not have to drive to Albuquerque as much. This increase was also discussed during the Senate floor debate, despite this the bill doesn’t clarify about the two weeks.
Another solution would be for lawmakers to add in this bill and direct in the legislation for licensure of dispensaries in the underserved rural areas in the State. Several area’s of the northern and southern part of the state are needing a dispensaries to serve patients. The state could direct in law and then could open a medical cannabis licensure expansion round for rural areas only, to meet these needs.


This legislation has really great potential to help patients, the Medical Marijuana Changes bill would increase Personal Production License benefits by allowing a patient to keep all that one can harvest. Removing 230 unit/gram Limit on PPL Harvest. Get your Personal Production License, as the benefits are worth it. Removal of the current THC Concentrate Cap that has been limited to 70% THC, the addition of “Substance Abuse/Addiction” as a Qualifying Condition, allows patients to be organ donor, and furthers Patient’s Protections with youth services. The bill would not allow children to be removed and placed into state custody based solely on an individual’s participation in the state’s medical cannabis program.
One of the bigger changes amended into SB-177, the Recognition of Non-Resident Medical Cannabis Cards. This is a great thing for the state’s medical cannabis program, in being able to show compassion and accommodate the patient’s from other states. It could allow some medical cannabis tourism and ease travel for patients in others states. Reciprocity could generate revenue for the state and help lower current prices that are oddly higher at the moment for the program.
One portion that was removed during the Senate Floor debate that the House members will hopefully add back in was, presumptive eligibility into medical cannabis program with in 24 hrs after the patient’s doctor has recommended medical cannabis. They removed the following: “The department shall presume eligible and issue, within twenty-four hours of receipt of application completed in accordance with Subsection B of this section and department rules, a registry identification card to any person who applies for a registry identification card. Within thirty days of receipt of an application, the department shall verify the information contained in an application submitted pursuant to LECUA law.”
This is a very important section that needs serious reconsidering as the qualifying health conditions in the medical cannabis program are all chronic health conditions and some that are terminal. Once a doctor determines with their patient the right treatment to go with, it is started that day if it involves a taking pill and therefore this should also be provided for treatment with medical cannabis. The State has 30 days to issue a patient card and currently the Department of Health is doing a good job by issuing patient cards in just under two weeks under current rules. Patients applying into the program have also past away waiting for a card. Presumptive eligibility is the best way to prevent patients from waiting for life saving medicine and should be part of a compassionate use program.
As New Mexico works to define a model for legalization of cannabis in New Mexico, it must protect and improve the state’s medical cannabis program and put patients first as well, lawmakers have a lot of history to contend with. New Mexico’s medical cannabis history started in 1978, after public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis.


By
Jason Barker – Medical Cannabis Patient & Organizer

with the LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico

Medical Cannabis Advocacy And Strategic Messaging


Words matter. The way advocates talk about medical cannabis shapes the opinions of the public and policy makers. There are an infinite number of topics surrounding medical cannabis but not all of them are politically relevant or advantageous. Strategic messages steer the public discourse toward relevant topics, defined priorities, and preferred language. It will help define the parameters of the debate and guide your audience toward desired actions. Strategic messages are not exhaustive explanations of your beliefs and rationales. They are carefully crafted statements or slogans that are designed to reach and move your target audiences.


A. IDENTIFY THE TARGET AUDIENCE
The first question you should ask when developing strategic messages is ‘WHO are we trying to reach?’ It is important to identify our target audiences so that your messages can be crafted to reach them. Although our primary goals and key objectives include “the general public,” our public awareness efforts should be focused toward more specific target audiences.
Ignore the Opposition and Convince the Majority In social change movements, advocacy organizations should not expend any effort on trying to convert the opposition. They are unlikely to listen or be persuaded. Instead, it’s most important to focus on clear supporters and those who fall somewhere in the middle on our issues – those who are open to being influenced. Fortunately for our mission, those two groups equal the overwhelming majority of the US population)
Specifically, we should target:
” Self-Identified Medical Cannabis Supporters who are not aware of the urgent threats faced by patients and their providers in states that allow access, the situation of patients now being forced into the underground market to secure their medicine, and the pain that many endure because of fear of arrest.
” Other Political Activists/Potential Allies who do not yet see how the safe and legal access to cannabis therapeutics is intertwined with issues they are already actively working on such as HIV/AIDS advocacy, consumer health care issues, Religion vs. Science advocacy, etc. ”
The “Mushy Middle” who may not identify themselves as activists, but can be swayed and influenced to act on this issue if it is framed as something that is or could be affecting their lives or the lives of their loved ones. This group may not respond to medical cannabis as a social or political issue.


Focus on Key Stakeholders
Advocates should target the following (even more narrowly defined than the audiences listed above) key stakeholder audiences who have the power to create meaningful and significant change:
” Law Enforcement Community whose members can exercise influence over federal, state, and local-level decision making and who have the power to make recommendations and formulate drug enforcement strategies.
• Opinion Leaders like leading media pundits, politicians, and community leaders who frame issues impacting public health and policy and consequently influence the public’s perception of those issues. They may be educated on the legal and legislative attacks on medical cannabis but are not aware of the particularly urgent threat to patients.
• Acute Care Medical Communities (Cancer, AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn’s Disease, etc.) since they may potentially need these services, and, as health care consumers, can make demands on the medical community to provide those services as an integral part of medicine.
• Medical Professionals and Scientific Communities who may think that “medical marijuana” is a political/social issue rather than an issue of public health policy.
B. GET YOUR MESSAGE HEARD: “SAY WHAT YOU MEAN TO SAY”
Know Your Target Audience If you want to reach your target audience, it is important to consider what messages they want to hear. For instance, think about how you would tell your mother a story about a date as opposed to what you would tell your best friend. While the two stories are about the same event, they will most likely differ in details and descriptions. In this case, you are sizing up your target audience and giving them the details they want or need. Advocates often try to communicate information that their audiences don’t understand because they are not as educated as the advocates are on the issue. For instance, talking about good dispensaries versus bad dispensaries may turn someone off who is just learning about the medical efficacy of cannabis.


Key Media/Public Messages
Key Messages are what you need the public to know about your issue. Remember you do not need to fully disclose political strategy in these messages but rather articulate problems on your terms. Key messages should be used to craft sound bites, slogans, and any press statements.
Key Media/Public Messages should:
• Appeal to target audiences but frame issues on your terms
• Communicate problem and the cause
• Communicate the solution and who has the power to make that solution
• Communicate actions that reinforce your goals


Framing Our Issue
One of the most popular buzzwords in media relations and public advocacy is “framing.” Taken together, the words, phrases, and themes chosen create a “framework” for how those issues are discussed publicly. In our world of 30-second sound bites and 10- minute meetings, those who frame issues well often win public discussions.


By taking control of how our issues are framed for the media and policymakers, we are able to:
• Define our issues on our terms-use terms like medicine, cannabis, medicate, dispensaries, provider and patients, NOT drugs, marijuana, get high, clubs, grower and users;
• Identify how our efforts are part of social issues that impact a greater number of people than our members-i.e. medical cannabis represents the struggle of all patients who cannot access their medicine that their doctors agree is the best treatment;
• Identify who are the most important players including those who can make changes; and
• Put the opposition on the defensive-i.e. ask the DEA and other opponents to prove that the harms of cannabis therapeutics are worse than the pain these patients face every day or the harassment they face from the Federal Government.


How to Frame: Using our Key Messages
The best strategy for framing issues is to stand back, look at our primary goals, and develop the best messages for communicating those goals. By condensing our complex issues down to a few key messages, we will be able to:
• Communicate the “frame” around our issues-think of the “big picture” values, such as compassion, liberty, democracy, medical professionalism;
• Highlight our primary goals-Safe and legal access to cannabis therapeutics NOW;
• Focus reporters and policymakers on the most relevant issues- i.e. we’re talking about patients, not criminals; and
• Maintain control and direct interviews with reporters and meetings with policymakers. Don’t let distracting questions pull you away from your strategic message.


MESSAGE DISCIPLINE: ONE MESSAGE, MANY MESSENGERS
If we practice “message discipline”;  consistently and persistently delivering these same key messages we will have the greatest impact. As mentioned earlier, key messages are more likely to reach target audiences if they echo again and again through all of our public advocacy work, especially media outreach. The best way to ensure that we stay “on message” is for every spokesperson whether in California, Montana, or elsewhere to consistently use strategic messaging. Although factual information is important, reporters and policymakers are also interested in having social problems expressed in human terms. Personal stories are essential elements in producing compelling news stories and successfully educating policymakers. These messages are only intended as guidelines for speaking about cannabis therapeutics. They are only compelling when injected with the more personal stories of why and how ASA advocates are committed to this issue.


NEGATIVE CONNOTATIONS & BETTER TERMINOLOGY
Marijuana Cannabis
Weed, stash, dope, etc Medicine
Smoke pot Consume cannabis, medicate
Pot club Medical cannabis dispensary
Dealer, Seller Cannabis provider
Buy, Score Acquire
Sell Provide
Vendor, grower Patient-cultivator
Hash Cannabis extract
Clones Cuttings or plants
Buzz, high, stoned, etc. Medicated, cerebral effects
“420” Just do not use it!


Language is important because it defines our ideas. Words have a power that transcends their formal meaning. When we change words, we can also change the thoughts that underlie them. By changing the words we use to describe cannabis and herbal medicine, we can help our fellow citizens understand the truth about it, and see through the decades of propaganda.
That understanding will convert cannabis opponents into supporters, and bring closer the day when all our prisoners go free, and nobody else is ever again arrested for using or possessing “marijuana”.
(source :harborsidehealthcenter.com/learn/the-M-word.html)


We prefer to use the word cannabis, because it is a respectful, scientific term that encompasses all the many different uses of the plant.


The word “marijuana” or “marihuana” is an emotional, pejorative term that has played a key role in creating the negative stigma that still tragically clings to this holistic, herbal medicine. Most cannabis users recognize the “M word” as offensive, once they learn its history.


The “marijuana” term started off life as a Mexican folk name for cannabis, but was first popularized in the US by the notorious yellow press publisher, William Randolph Hearst. Hearst was a racist, as well as being committed to the prohibition of marijuana, which threatened his timber investments. He used his control of hundreds of newspapers to orchestrate a vicious propaganda campaign against cannabis, which featured lurid (and false) stories about black and brown men committing outrageous acts of murder and mayhem. That campaign played on then-predominantly racist public opinion to make cannabis illegal at the federal level in 1937. Since then, “marijuana” has come to be associated with the idea that cannabis is a dangerous and addictive intoxicant, not a holistic, herbal medicine for helping people deal with the effects of cancer, AIDS, wasting syndrome and other conditions. This stigma has played a big part in stymying cannabis legalization efforts throughout the U.S.


Pot probably comes from the Mexican ‘potiguaya,’ which is a word for seeds, which may come from the expression ‘potacion de gauays,’ which would mean ‘a sorrow soup,’ which was some kind of concoction involving marijuana.. How it got shortened to ‘pot’ is unclear, but it was probably around the 1930s that Americans started using that word.  (Source: Geoffrey Nunberg, a linguist at UC Berkeley and NPR “Fresh Air” contributor.)


From a botanist standpoint, cannabis is a genus of plant, and comes in various species such as sativa, indica and ruderalis (or sativa, indica and afghanica depending on the research you reference) and thus ‘cannabis sativa’ and ‘cannabis indica’ (or ‘c. indica and c. afghanica) are the correct names when dealing with the various forms of the “cannabis” plant — not ‘marijuana.’


The ABCs of CITIZEN ADVOCACY


Citizen lobbying is an essential part of being a medical cannabis advocate and it is the only way elected officials will know how to represent you. It is true that the issues surrounding medical cannabis are politically polarizing and may not be the number one issue for elected officials. But buying into defeatist attitudes concerning representation or conspiracy theories about our opposition has paralyzed our movement for years. Most elected officials have never met a medical cannabis advocate and have formed opinions about the issue based on media reports or our opposition. It is easier for elected officials to fall into intellectual or ethical stances against medical cannabis if they do not have a face to put with the issue. That is where you come in! In the truest definition of democracy, our elected officials represent their constituency in government. Their constituents have thousands of needs. If you are not asking them to add medical cannabis to the list there is no need for them to advocate for you.


WHY CITIZEN LOBBY?
It is natural to feel intimidated about contacting your elected officials. But the strength and power politicians have is derived directly from the constituents who elected them into office. Legislators are elected to represent your views and they want to hear from their constituents.


More than ever, elected officials are focused on learning about how a particular piece of legislation will impact their constituents. And there are more ways than ever for constituents to express their viewpoints to elected officials, including but not limited to: letters, phone calls, email, YouTube, Facebook, Town Hall forums, Twitter, campaign events, visits to the member’s office, and more.


As a voter, you possess the most effective tool to influence change: your vote. As a constituent, you have the power to hold each representative accountable on the issues that affect you. But our democracy is not a spectator sport! If you want change, then you have to talk to the people elected to make our laws.


As a medical cannabis advocate, it is important that you understand your power and know how to use it! You Have the Power—Not Lobbyists According to a survey of congressional staffers conducted by the Congressional Management Foundation in 2015, members of Congress are more likely to be swayed on an issue by concerned citizens who visit, write, or call their offices than by the efforts of paid lobbyists. As it turns out, citizens have more power than they realize!


The survey report, Communicating with Congress: Perceptions of Citizen Advocacy on Capitol Hill, provides valuable insight about how crucial the work of grassroots advocacy is to manifest change and about which tactics work best. For instance, nearly the entire sample of respondents, 97 percent, agreed that personal visits from constituents had “some” or “a lot” of influence on an undecided Member—more than any other influence group or strategy.


In fact, visits from constituent representatives, like lobbyists, came in second. Close examination of the survey reveals that even personalized letters, e-mails, phone calls, and questions or comments at town hall meetings by constituents were more likely to change a member’s mind than the efforts of a lobbyist.


The study also explored the type of advocacy that staffers believe is most effective. Turns out that content matters more than medium. Specifically, staffers indicated that hand-written or personalized notes— even when they are fewer in number—have a bigger impact than form letters and emails crafted by influence groups.


The point is, your lawmakers want to hear from Y-O-U! They want to know how the growing divide between state and federal medical cannabis laws is affecting you and your family. They want to know what legislation would help their constituents and why. They want to know why changing federal law is important to you!


If Not You, Then Who?
Medical cannabis advocates are not the only people talking with legislators about medical cannabis law and policy. Elected officials are hearing from police organization, medical cannabis opponents, Chamber of Commerce, and members of special interest groups opposed to the use of cannabis even for medical purposes.
It is important for all medical cannabis advocates to think about the following questions:
” Without hearing from you, how will your legislator know what is important to you?
” Do you want to trust decisions about access to medical cannabis solely to lobbyists and policymakers?


Each and every individual who holds a state license that authorizes the use or provision of cannabis for medical purposes is breaking federal law.


The point is that you are the patient, the physician, the caregiver, the provider, the lawyer, the nurse, or family member who is affected by medical cannabis laws and policy. You are the voter with the power to hold elected officials accountable for their positions on policy matters. And you are the expert about how these laws and policies affect your daily life.


So if you are not talking with you elected officials about medical cannabis, then ask yourself, “Who is?”


THE BASICS
Accurate.
Medical marijuana is just one of many issues your legislator is concerned with at any given time. Make certain that the information you are providing is direct and accurate. Never lie or provide inaccurate information. If you don’t know something, be honest about it. You can always locate the correct information after the meeting and use that as an excuse to follow up in the future.


Brief.
In most cases, you will have a limited amount of time to make your pitch. Keep it short, and keep it simple! It is extremely difficult to relay ten pieces of information in three minutes. It is even more difficult to comprehend ten pieces of information in three minutes. Thus, it is vital that you think carefully about two or three main talking points you hope to communicate—and stick to these points throughout your advocacy.


Courteous.
Whether you agree or disagree with your legislator it is important that you maintain some level of respect. Your goal as an advocate is to create a safe space for your legislator so that tough choices can be made with confidence. It is important that you go out of your way to be a positive resource for your legislator. Be punctual and patient. Don’t lie or exaggerate. Don’t argue or raise your voice. Don’t be rude or obnoxious.


Do Follow-Up.
Be proactive and responsive. Follow up your meeting with a thank-you letter that outlines the various topics covered during the meeting, reiterates any commitments your legislator made, and includes any additional information or materials requested during the meeting. Also, you should use this opportunity to accurately communicate any information you didn’t readily have available or didn’t know during the course of your meeting. When communicating with your legislators, do not feel that it is your responsibility to be a “know-it-all.” A few short position statements about why you support or oppose a specific piece of legislation will suffice. Always give your legislator your name, address, and telephone number so that they know you are one of their constituents. Be sure to include this information whether you visit in person, call, or write. Most importantly, be accurate, brief and courteous when communicating with your legislators. Remember, legislators are people, too!


Timing is very important.
If the legislation you are concerned about is imminent, contacting your legislator quickly by phone or email can be very effective. However, if you have time, take advantage of other influential tactics, such as writing a letter, attending a city or county council meeting, calling your legislator’s office or meeting directly with your elected leaders. The key is to use timing to your advantage with each tactic you use.
Voice Your Position and Ask for Action!
Legislators frequently act on behalf of their constituency. Even if your legislator does not currently support your position it can be extremely helpful to contact them on a regular basis. Make your concerns vocal, and always ask for your legislator for an action.


Know the Issue.
Legislators have several issues they are concerned with at any given time. Make certain that you are relaying concise and accurate information. Prepare and distribute information based on sound, scientific research. Ask questions about your legislator’s feelings toward a particular issue, and be ready for your legislator to ask you questions about your position.


Listen & Share Information.
It is very important to listen to your legislators. Really understand what their positions are and why. Relay any information you receive from your legislator to the members of your organization, community, family and friends. Information helps to shape future talking points and also helps to broaden the audience.


Dos and Don’ts
THE DON’Ts
• Lie or exaggerate
• Waste time
• Be a know-it-all
• Make promises you can’t deliver
• Be argumentative
• Burn bridges


THE DOs
• Relay accurate information
• Make your arguments brief
• Be courteous, punctual and patient
• Make yourself a resource
• Choose 2 or 3 main talking points, and stick to them!
• Ask for a specific action
• Use time wisely
• Listen & share information
• Follow up: always write a thank-you note



Writing Your Legislators, Governor, Or US Congressional Members
A letter to your lawmaker is next most effective and the most common form of communication. Writing letters helps create a paper trail. Most letters are noted and answered by legislators or their staff. The amount of mail received by a legislator (“mail count”) sometimes helps to determine his or her approach to an issue. Here are some tips to get started.


Be clear and concise.
The purpose for writing the letter should be stated in the first paragraph. If your letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly.


Be specific. Ask for action.
Tell your legislator exactly what action you want taken, and give the reasons for your position. Do not hesitate to cite your own experiences or how the proposed legislation will directly impact you. If you are an expert in a particular field (i.e. a doctor, lawyer, patient, etc.) mentioning that can help to build credibility.


Include supplemental information.
Enclosed with the letter you can include related editorials, news articles, research studies, letters to the editor, or other supplemental materials that support your position or generally relate to the issue you are concerned with.


One issue at a time.
Address only one issue in each letter, and, if possible, keep the letter to one page. Also, thank your legislator in advance for the consideration s/he will give to the issue.

Knowledge And Awareness  

Knowledge can be equated with the contents of consciousness, in the present, future or past. It consists of elements of the phenomenal world and their interrelationships. As such it can be fully described and communicated and also explained within the current scientific paradigm, at least potentially.

Awareness, on the other hand, is a label we use to refer to the subjective nature of consciousness. What is called the hard problem of consciousness. The fact that there is something that it is like to be conscious. This aspect of consciousness cannot be explained within the current scientific paradigm, the best that science can do is to assume that it will be fully explained in the future as an illusion of the self-referential information processing in the brain. This is called eliminative materialism.

Other people believe that awareness is a fundamental aspect of reality, rather than produced by any process of matter or energy, noting that all phenomena of matter are inferred from conscious experiences.
Find Your Legislator Here
Call and email your Senator in your district and call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard.
Senate Chamber main phone 505-986-4714 and general email: senate@nmlegis.gov


Call and email your House of Representative member in your district and call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard. House of Representatives main phone number 505-986-4751 and general email: house@nmlegis.gov.


Contact the Legislative Council Service for general questions about the Legislature.


“Dear New Mexicans and Visitors, I am committed to listening to your concerns and working to answer your questions.  Therefore, the Constituent Services division within my office has been directed to professionally and efficiently assist in answering your questions and responding to your requests of state government.
My staff is here to serve you and will do everything they can to address your concerns.
Please do not hesitate to call my office at 505-476-2200 to speak with a Constituent Services representative or fill out the form below and we will contact you in a timely manner.
Sincerely, Governor Susana Martinez”


Submit A Letter To The Editor Or Opinion Column
Local and national media coverage is an important part of informing our communities, opinion leaders, and potential allies about cannabis therapeutics and the challenges that patients, providers, researchers and doctors face. Patients and advocates must often take the news to print, broadcast, and online media outlets to be sure our voices are heard. As an advocate, you have an important role in shaping how news about medical cannabis is reported – and how it is received by the public-at-large.


Americans For Safe Access Letters to the Editor How-To Tips
What Makes a Good Letter to the Editor?
http://www.safeaccessnow.org/letters_to_the_editor_how_to


AbqJournal Letter to Editor and Opinion
The word limit for a letter to the editor is 350. The word limit for an opinion column is 650.
Link to send one online : http://www.abqjournal.com/letters/new


AbqJournal Speak Up Guidelines:
If you want to gripe, grouse, whine or bellyache about a generic topic, submit your opinion in the form below. The same goes if you want to dish out praise or thanks. Either way, you have to do it in 50 words or less. You can’t identify anyone you criticize. Keep it clean. No cursing, please. We don’t need your name, just initials. And it’s cheaper than therapy.


Santa Fe Reporter
Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.


The Santa Fe New Mexican
Write us! We welcome opinions from the readers. Send either letters (150 words) or My Views (600 words) The New Mexican’s editorial department publishes the newspaper’s daily editorials, letters to the editor. The department seeks to capture the opinions of the community and express them in the newspaper. Letters to the Editor can be emailed to:  letters@sfnewmexican.com


The Taos News


The Las Cruces Sun-News
Letters may be edited for brevity, clarity, libel and taste. Letters must be 300 words or less to be considered for publication. Letters must include the writer’s full name, address, ZIP code and phone number for verification purposes. Please allow 14 days between letters.


Alamogordo Daily News
Letters may be edited for brevity, clarity, libel and taste. Letters must be 225 words or less to be considered for publication. Letters must include the writer’s full name, address, ZIP code and phone number for verification purposes. Please allow 30 days between letters.


Artesia Daily Press


The Farmington Daily Times
The Daily Times welcomes letters to the editor. Your submission of no more than 400 words must include your name, address and a telephone number for verification. All letters must be signed by one individual or no more than three individuals. The Daily Times reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Letters can also be emailed to letters@daily-times.com or mailed to:
Letter to the Editor
The Daily Times
203 W. Main St.
Farmington, NM 87401


Hobbs News-Sun
Send a tip or a letter to the editor
For questions regarding stories published in the Hobbs News-Sun, email the editor; editor@hobbsnews.com


By Jason Barker – Organizer & Medical Cannabis Patient
LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico



Lynn & Erin Compassionate Use Act Patient’s Coalition of New Mexico ~ A GrassRoots Movement!
UNITE-NETWORK-GROW-INFORM-KNOW-EDUCATE-ACTIVISM-VOTE-HEALTH-WELLNESS
(All Rights Reserved 04/20/2016)

Senate Joint Resolution 19: “ALLOW FOR POSSESSION AND PERSONAL USE OF MARIJUANA”

Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee on 3/8/2017


It is proposed to amend Article 20 of the constitution of New Mexico by adding a new section to read:
“Possession and personal use of marijuana shall be lawful by persons twenty-one years of age or older only if the legislature provides by law for: the production, processing, transportation,
sale, taxation and acceptable quantities and places of use of marijuana to protect public health and safety; and any state revenue generated from the taxation of marijuana to be distributed to the general fund.” The amendment proposed by this resolution shall be submitted to the people for their approval or rejection at the next general election or at any special election prior to that date that may be called for that purpose.

Senate Joint Resolution 19 proposes to amend the state constitution by adding a new section to allow for possession and personal use of marijuana for persons 21 years of age and older. This provision is not self-executing, but depends on implementing legislation regulating the use and taxation of marijuana to protect public health and safety. Any tax revenues are to be distributed to the general fund. The resolution is to be submitted for approval by the people of the state in the next general election (November 2018) or any special election called for that purpose.


DOH, in its analysis of marijuana legislation introduced in the 2016 session, reported these health-related concerns related to marijuana: Marijuana is not a benign substance. A number of negative consequences of marijuana use are known despite the Federal restrictions on marijuana that have limited research into the effects (either positive or negative).
“Among them:  Addiction/Dependence: The lifetime risk of dependence is about 9 percent of marijuana users. While this is lower than the risks for nicotine, heroin, cocaine, and alcohol, it is not negligible (Bostwick, 2012). Addiction/Dependence also entails a withdrawal syndrome (Greydanus, et al, 2013, Bostwick, 2012).  


Research studies have noted that cannabis users “demonstrate important deficits in prospective memory and executive functioning that exist beyond acute cannabis intoxication” (Greydanus, et al, 2013). This appears to be a relatively subtle effect.  Chronic use of cannabis is associated with increased rates of psychosis. Frequent cannabis use doubles the risk for schizophrenia and psychotic symptoms (Greydanus, et al, 2013).


The question of whether cannabis causes psychosis remains unresolved, but there is some evidence that it worsens the course of psychotic illness (Bostwick, 2012).  The risk of motor vehicle crashes involving death or injury is about two times as high for drivers under the influence of marijuana than for sober drivers. Tests used in the field for the detection of impaired drivers may not be precise enough to detect marijuana (Greydanus, et al, 2013).
Further, DOH commented that many of the ill effects of marijuana are magnified for adolescent users. The average age for beginning marijuana use is around 18 years of age. Dependence and psychosis are much more common among users who begin in their teens, especially the early teens (Bostwick, 2012). Research has shown permanent changes in the brains of persistent users who began use in their early teens (Greydanus, et al, 2013, Bostwick, 2012). Dependence seems quite rare in users who began after age 25. DOH also presented these observations from two states that have legalized marijuana:  Most teens who enter substance abuse treatment programs in Washington State report that marijuana is the main or only drug they use (Washington State Tobacco, Alcohol and Other Drug Trends Report, 2012). Colorado and Washington have seen increases in emergency department visits from children accidentally consuming THC-laced products since their laws legalizing marijuana went into effect. (http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2014/11/legal_pot_will_boost_traffic_a.ht ml)


In Colorado, marijuana-related exposures for children five and under have increased 268 percent from 2006-2009 to 2010-2013, triple the national rate, according to the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Partnership. In Colorado, use of marijuana among 12-17 year-olds is 39 percent higher, and use of marijuana among 18-25 year-olds is 42 percent higher, than the national rate for adolescents of the same age.
(The Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact – Volume 3, January 2016, available at http://www.rmhidta.org)


Finally, DOH reports marijuana legalization would likely increase use among teens who already use marijuana, according to data from a survey of U.S. high school students. Nearly two-thirds of teens who reported using marijuana at least once in their lifetime said that legalizing the drug would make them more likely to use it. In addition, more than three-fourths of heavy marijuana users reported that legalizing the drug would make them more likely to use it. And sixteen percent of teens who reported that they had never used marijuana agreed that they would be more likely to use marijuana if it were legal.
(Adapted by CESAR from The Partnership for a Drug-Free America and the MetLife Foundation, The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS): Teens and Parents, 2013 http://www.ibhinc.org/pdfs/CESARFAX2226TeensReportedUseofMarijuanaIfLegal.pdf)”


Call and email your Senator in your district and call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard.
Senate Chamber main phone 505-986-4714 and general email: senate@nmlegis.gov


Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee on 3/8/2017  Wednesday – 8:00 a.m. (Room 321)


Committee Members

Title
Name
Party
Role
Senator
D
Chair
Senator
D
Vice Chair
Senator
R
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
R
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
R
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
R
Ranking Member


According to the National Conference of State Legislators,  total of 28 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico now allow for comprehensive public medical marijuana and cannabis programs and 17 more states allow use of “low THC, high cannabidiol (CBD)” products for medical reasons. Eight states and the District of Columbia now have legalized small amounts of marijuana for adult recreational use. State cannabis policy reform surged forward on Nov. 8, 2016, with voters in four states, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada, approving adult-use recreational cannabis; Colorado and Washington measures passed in 2012, and Alaska, Oregon and District of Columbia in the fall of 2014.  That is 45 states with legal cannabis laws and 8 of those states have complete legal adult use of cannabis.


At least 30 states passed legislation related to industrial hemp. Generally, states have taken three approaches: (1) establish industrial hemp research and/or pilot programs, (2) authorize studies of the industrial hemp industry, or (3) establish commercial industrial hemp programs. At least 16 states have legalized industrial hemp production for commercial purposes and 20 states have passed laws allowing research and pilot programs. Seven states—Colorado, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island and Virginia—have approved the creation of both pilot/research and commercial programs.


  1. Cannabis is Medicine and the Federal Government has a Patent for it.  The U.S. Patent Office issued patent #6630507 to the U.S.Health and Human Services filed on 2/2/2001. The patent lists the use of cannabinoids found within the plant cannabis sativa plant as useful in certain neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and HIV dementia. Since cannabis sativa (marijuana) contains compounds recognized and endorsed by an agency of the U.S. government- Why is it that cannabis remains on the Federal Schedule One list of drugs? The issuance of patent #6630507 is a direct contradiction of the Government’s own definition for classification of a Schedule 1 drug. The U.S. government’s own National Institutes of Health researchers even concluded: “Based on evidence currently available the Schedule I classification is not tenable; it is not accurate that cannabis has no medical value, or that Information on safety is lacking.” Maybe there are some big pharma lobbyists and bigwig campaign finance contributors that would get a little upset. In article in American-Statesman staff writer Jeremy Schwartz in 2012 noted that in 2011, “the Pentagon spent more on pills, injections and vaccines than it did on Black Hawk helicopters, Abrams tanks, Hercules C-130 cargo planes and Patriot missiles — combined.” The military spent at least $2.7 billion on antidepressants and more than $1.6 billion on opioid painkillers such as Oxycontin and hydrocodone over the past decade. More than $507 million was spent on the sleeping pill Ambien and its generic equivalents.”  the pharmaceutical industry spent about $1.7 million for more than 1,400 trips for Defense Department doctors and pharmacists to places such as Paris, Las Vegas and New Orleans between 1998 and 2007.  All those Pills killed a lot of Veterans, Cannabis has a 3000 year history with zero deaths associated with it.  “The American Medical Association has no objection to any reasonable regulation of the medicinal use of cannabis and its preparations and derivatives. It does pretest, however, against being called upon to pay a special tax, to use special order forms in order to procure the drug, to keep special records concerning its professional use and to make special returns to the Treasury Department officials, as a condition precedent to the use of cannabis in the practice of medicine.”                     
    ~Wm. C. Woodward, Legislative Counsel – 11:37 AM Monday, July 12, 1937
  2. Nowhere in the US Constitution is it written that the federal government can regulate cannabis. The Constitution defines the powers of the federal government, and according to the Tenth Amendment, if it’s not in the Constitution, it’s a state power. States’ rights have advanced state medical cannabis programs since the 1970’s and paved the way for states with legal adult use of cannabis, states should continue on that same policy path for the issue of cannabis research. States like Washington and Oregon should get full commendations on leading the way for states’ rights in the act of “legislating” for freedom by breaking tyrannical barriers for research on a plant with so much promise. Prohibition of cannabis is not a fundamental right that should be imposed on the states by the federal government, it’s a choice that states should be allowed to make based on their culture and their values-allowing states to once again be laboratories of democracy. “…a state may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” – Justice Louis Brandeis
  3. Cannabis is a cash crop. So let’s talk economy. New Mexico’s economy continues to be one of the slowest growing economies in the country.  The state budget shortfalls for 2016 totals near $600 million, and this slow economic growth by the state reveals too much dependence on the federal government and oil revenues. Colorado cannabis tax revenues now greatly exceeds original estimates of $70 million per year. Canada has had industrial hemp since 1998, and farmers there have reported net profits of $200 to $250 per acre. Most Canadian hemp is exported to the United States. The Colorado Tourism Office reports that 12% are visiting Colorado dispensaries and 5% specifically due to cannabis legalization there. The activities that cannabis tourist reported engaging in included: sightseeing and wine tours, historical sites, hiking, camping, mountain biking, winter snow sports, nightlife, festivals and farmers’ markets, according to the survey.  All great activities in New Mexico with a Balloon Fiesta to boot. Colorado was the first to allow recreational cannabis sales in January 2014, followed by Washington in July 2014, and then Oregon sales began October 2015. Since then Headset Inc, found that the average recreational consumer spends $647 annually on cannabis.
  4. Cannabis is 114 Times Less Toxic Than That Other Legal Substance, Alcohol.  In a comparative analysis on the risks of recreational drugs, alcohol was the top contender, while cannabis was considered the lowest risk, making cannabis literally 114 times safer to use than alcohol, a legal substance for adults ages 21 and up.  And with that mention of alcohol we know the DUI problem New Mexico has…In late December 2016, Research and Practice, a peer-reviewed science journal, published an article that briefly turned the marijuana world on its head. Cosigned by a half-dozen Columbia University PhDs, “U.S. Traffic Fatalities, 1985-2014, and Their Relationship To Medical Marijuana Laws” came to the following shocking conclusion: “Both MMLs (medical marijuana laws) and dispensaries were associated with reductions in traffic fatalities, especially those among aged 25 to 44 years.” In other words, these scientists said, when it comes to driving, states with legal cannabis laws save lives.
  5. Legalization Hasn’t Led to Increased Use Among Teens and Minors.  Since cannabis was legalized in Colorado, many feared that it would lead to increased consumption among youth. In fact, legalization has had the exact opposite effect – due to education and regulations restricting use to adults, the percentage of teenagers in Colorado who admit to using cannabis has been steadily dropping from 22% to 20% between 2011 and 2013, and remains below the national average at 23.4%.  
  6. Cannabis As An Exit Drug for Addiction.  In New Mexico, according to the Department of Health, the drug overdose rate in 2014 was still twice that of the national average. It was the #1 cause of unintentional injury or death in New Mexico. Seventy-five percent of those drug overdose deaths involving opioids or heroin. During the time period of 2001 – 2014, medical prescription sales of opioids increased 236% in New Mexico.  That’s lead to an average of 10 New Mexicans dying per week. New Mexico saw a statistically significant increase from 2013-2014 in overdose deaths caused by opioids. According to CDC state data, a increase of 20.8% in opioid overdose deaths was reported. “Research suggests that people are using cannabis as an exit drug to reduce the use of substances that are potentially more harmful, such as opioid pain medication.” Says a lead investigator on addiction, Zach Walsh, a professor of psychology at University of British Columbia.  For example, a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found a 25 percent lower rate of opioid overdose deaths in states with legal medical cannabis, compared to those without such laws.  Another study, published in Health Affairs, found that in states with medical marijuana, each doctor wrote 1,800 fewer annual opioid prescriptions. A study by the Rand Institute showed that medical cannabis states have not only lower overdose death rates — but also lower opioid addiction rates. And, research conducted with chronic pain patients found that those who used medical marijuana were able to reduce opioid by use by 64 percent — while experiencing fewer side effects and better quality of life. Other research, meanwhile, finds reductions in the number of drivers age 21- 40 involved in fatal crashes with opioids in their system in medical cannabis states.
  7. The state of New Mexico should legalize cannabis and hemp to first and foremost start paying the state legislators.  A hybrid state legislature: Meeting for most of the year and pays the legislators as full-time employees. They can serve the constituents much better because of their extended time in office and ability to devote more time to each issue. New Mexico is the only state with a unsalaried legislature. Providing funding for a paid legislature and state budget reform can be achieved with cannabis and hemp legalization; in conjunction with the utilization of solar, wind, and geothermal energy sources. The state has the renewable resources to potentially provide 1,000 times more clean energy than the Public Service Company of New Mexico’s current demand, according to the state Energy Conservation and Management Division. This will create jobs, has vast potential for the state universities to benefit, and creates a new business market to keep college graduates in New Mexico.States have a paid rather than volunteer fire departments, law enforcement, health-care workers, and teachers, to name a few. The reason is that we rightly expect increased reliability, productivity, and professionalism when we pay for services as opposed to them being provided voluntarily.

Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Hearing – April 2017

New Mexico Department of Health
Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Hearing And Petition Requirements


The Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Hearing: Friday, April 7th 2017 from 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM at Harold Runnels Building-1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505
The meeting will be on the first floor in the auditorium (Room A-1006). Petitions must be received at least 30 days before the hearing to be included on the agenda. Copies of the agenda can be obtained 72 hours prior to the meeting.


A petitioner must file the following information with the Medical Cannabis Program:
1. The name, address and telephone number of the petitioner and the medical condition, medical treatment or disease sought to be added to the existing debilitating medical conditions;
2. An introductory narrative requesting the inclusion of a new medical condition, medical treatment or disease;
3. A summary or summaries of the proposed benefits from the medical use of cannabis specific to the medical condition, medical treatment or disease sought to be added to the existing medical conditions approved for participation in the program, including any credible published studies known to the petitioner;
4. Medical records from the petitioner which are relevant to the condition, treatment or disease sought to be added to the list of eligible conditions for enrollment;
5. A copy of the petitioner’s New Mexico driver’s license or comparable New Mexico state or federal issued photo identification card verifying New Mexico residence.

The petition may be presented to the Medical Advisory Board by either the petitioner or their representative.
Statement of intent to present technical evidence:
If the petitioner wishes to present technical evidence at the hearing, the petition shall include a statement of intent. The statement of intent to present technical evidence shall include:
(a) The name of the person filing the statement;
(b) The name of each witness;
(c) An estimate of the length of the direct testimony of each witness;
(d) A list of exhibits, if any, to be offered into evidence at the hearing; and;
(e) A summary or outline of the anticipated direct testimony of each witness.

Please submit two copies of the petition as the information will be redacted to protect the identity of the petitioner. Only the Medical Cannabis Program staff will know the identity of the petitioner, unless the petitioner wishes to meet with the Medical Advisory Board at the actual hearing. The Board is not available for individual meetings prior to the hearing.
All petitions should be either hand delivered or mailed to:
Medical Cannabis Program
New Mexico Dept. of Health
1190 St. Francis Dr, S3400
Santa Fe, NM 87505

( https://nmhealth.org/publication/view/regulation/129/ )

7.34.2.9                 PETITION REQUIREMENTS:
               A.            Petition requirements. The advisory board may accept and review petitions from any individual or association of individuals requesting the addition of a new medical condition, medical treatment or disease for the purpose of participating in the medical cannabis program and all lawful privileges under the act. Except as otherwise provided, a petitioner filing a petition shall file the petition and a copy with the medical cannabis program staff by either personal delivery or certified mail. In order for a petition to be processed and forwarded to the advisory board the following information shall be submitted to the medical cannabis program staff.
                               (1)           Petition format: Unless otherwise provided by this part or by order of the hearing officer, all documents, except exhibits, shall be prepared on 8 1/2 x 11-inch white paper, printed double-sided, if possible, and where appropriate, the first page of every document shall contain a heading and caption. The petitioner shall include in the petition documents a narrative address to the advisory board, which includes:
                                               (a)           petition caption stating the name, address and telephone number of the petitioner and the medical condition, medical treatment or disease sought to be added to the existing debilitating medical conditions;
                                               (b)           an index of the contents of the petition, an introductory narrative of the individual or association of individuals requesting the inclusion of a new medical condition, medical treatment or disease to include the individual or association of individuals’ relationship or interest for the request whether that interest is professional or as a concerned citizen;
                                               (c)           the proposed benefits from the medical use of cannabis specific to the medical condition, medical treatment or disease sought to be added to the existing debilitating medical conditions listed under the act; and
                                               (d)           any additional supporting medical, testimonial, or scientific documentation.
                               (2)           Statement of intent to present technical evidence: If the petitioner wishes to present technical evidence at the hearing, the petition shall include a statement of intent. The statement of intent to present technical evidence shall include:
                                               (a)           the name of the person filing the statement;
                                               (b)           the name of each witness;
                                               (c)           an estimate of the length of the direct testimony of each witness;
                                               (d)           a list of exhibits, if any, to be offered into evidence at the hearing; and
                                               (e)           a summary or outline of the anticipated direct testimony of each witness.
               B.            Qualified patient applicant petitioner: If the petitioner is submitting their requests as a potential qualified patient applicant the petitioner shall attach an original medical practitioner’s certification for patient eligibility form provided by the medical cannabis program manager or designee which includes the following information:
                               (1)           the name, address, telephone number and clinical licensure of the petitioner’s practitioner;
                               (2)           the medical justification for practitioner’s certification of the petitioner’s debilitating medical condition;
                               (3)           the practitioner’s signature and date of signature;
                               (4)           the name, address and date of birth of the petitioner;
                               (5)           the name, address and telephone number of the petitioner’s practitioner;
                               (6)           a reasonable xerographic copy of the petitioner’s New Mexico driver’s license or comparable New Mexico state or federal issued photo identification card verifying New Mexico residence;
                               (7)           documented parental consent if applicable to the petitioner;
                               (8)           if applicable, the petitioner’s potential debilitating medical condition;
                               (9)           the length of time the petitioner has been under the care of the practitioner providing the medical provider certification for patient eligibility;
                               (10)         the petitioner’s signature and date; and
                               (11)         a signed consent for release of medical information form provided by the medical cannabis program.
               C.            Petitioner confidentiality: The department shall maintain a confidential file containing the names and addresses of the persons who have either applied for or received a public hearing petition request. Individual names on the list shall be confidential and not subject to disclosure, except:
                               (1)           to authorized employees or agents of the department as necessary to perform the duties of the department pursuant to the provisions of the act or this part;
                               (2)           as provided in the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.
               D.            Department notification: The medical cannabis program manager or designee shall review each petition request and within reasonable time after receipt issue notice of docketing upon the petitioner, each advisory board member, and the advisory board legal counsel. The notice of docketing shall contain the petition caption and docket number, the date upon which the petition was received and scheduling date of the advisory board public hearing. A copy of this rule shall be included with a notice of docketing sent to the petitioner.
               E.            Examination allowed: Subject to the provisions of law restricting the public disclosure of confidential information, any person may, during normal business hours, inspect and copy any document filed in any public hearing proceeding. Inspection shall be permitted in accordance with the Inspection of Public Records Act, Sections 14-2-1 et seq., NMSA 1978, but may be limited by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Documents subject to inspection shall be made available by the medical cannabis program manager, or designee as appropriate. Unless waived by the department, the cost of duplicating documents or audio filed in any public hearing proceeding shall be borne by the person seeking the copies.
               F.            Notice of withdrawal: A petitioner may withdraw a petition at any time prior to a decision by the advisory board by filing a notice of withdrawal with the medical cannabis program manager or designee.
[7.34.2.9 NMAC – Rp, 7.34.2.9 NMAC, 2/27/2015]

Forms & Documents

This section is a comprehensive reference to all of the forms, documents, publications and resources that are currently available for the Medical Cannabis Program (MCP).

Applications

Forms

General Information

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Medical Cannabis Patient Frequently Asked Questions
  • Medical Cannabis Provider Frequently Asked Questions

Rules & Regulations

  • NMAC 7.34.2 – Medical cannabis advisory board responsibilities and duties.
  • NMAC 7.34.3 – Medical cannabis registry identification cards.
  • NMAC 7.34.4 – Medical cannabis licensing requirements for producers, couriers, manufacturers and laboratories.

7.34.2.10               ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC HEARING PROCEDURES:
               A.            Public hearing requirement: The advisory board shall convene by public hearing at least twice per year to accept and review petitions requesting the inclusion of medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the list of debilitating medical conditions. Any meeting consisting of a quorum of the advisory board members held for the purpose of evaluating, discussing or otherwise formulating specific opinions concerning the recommendation of a petition filed pursuant to this rule, shall be declared a public hearing open to the public at all times, unless a portion of the hearing is closed to protect information made confidential by applicable state or federal laws.  A petitioner or his or her representative may request to close a portion of the hearing to protect the disclosure of confidential information by submitting their request in writing and having that request delivered to medical cannabis program staff at least 48 hours prior to the hearing.
               B.            Location of the public hearing: Unless otherwise ordered by the advisory board, the public hearing shall be in held in New Mexico at a location sufficient to accommodate the anticipated audience.
               C.            Public hearing notice: The medical cannabis program manager or designee shall, upon direction from the advisory board chairperson, prepare a notice of public hearing setting forth the date, time and location of the hearing, a brief description of the petitions received, and information on the requirements for public comment or statement of intent to present technical evidence, and no later than 30 days prior to the hearing date, send copies, with requests for publication, to at least one newspaper of general circulation.  The program manager or designee may further issue notice of the hearing by any other means the department determines to be acceptable to provide notice to the public.
               D.            Public hearing agenda: The department shall make available an agenda containing a list of specific items to be discussed or information on how the public may obtain a copy of such agenda.
               E.            Postponement of hearing: Request for postponement of a public hearing will be granted, by the advisory board for good cause shown.
               F.            Statement of intent to present technical evidence: Any individual or association of individuals who wish to present technical evidence at the hearing shall, no later than 15 days prior to the date of the hearing, file a statement of intent. The statement of intent to present technical evidence shall include:
                               (1)           the name of the person filing the statement;
                               (2)           indication of whether the person filing the statement supports or opposes the petition at issue;
                               (3)           the name of each witness;
                               (4)           an estimate of the length of the direct testimony of each witness;
                               (5)           a list of exhibits, if any, to be offered into evidence at the hearing; and
                               (6)           a summary or outline of the anticipated direct testimony of each witness.
               G.            Ex parte discussions: At no time after the initiation and before the conclusion of the petition process under this part, shall the department, or any other party, interested participant or their representatives discuss ex parte the merits of the petitions with any advisory board member.
               H.            Public hearing process: The advisory board chairperson shall conduct the public hearing so as to provide a reasonable opportunity for all interested persons to be heard without making the hearing unreasonably lengthy or cumbersome or burdening the record with unnecessary repetition.
                               (1)           A quorum of the advisory board shall consist of three voting members.
                               (2)           The advisory board chairperson or alternate shall convene each public hearing by:
                                               (a)           introduction of the advisory board members;
                                               (b)           statutory authority of the board;
                                               (c)           statement of the public hearing agenda; and
                                               (d)           recognition of the petitioner.
                               (3)           Petitioner comment period. The petitioner or by representative may present evidence to the advisory board. The advisory board shall only consider findings of fact or scientific conclusions of medical evidence presented by the petitioner or by representative to the advisory board prior to or contemporaneously with the public hearing.
                               (4)           Public comment period: The advisory board may provide for a public comment period. Public comment may be by written comment, verbal or both.
                                               (a)           Written comment: Any individual or association of individuals may submit written comment to the advisory board either in opposition or support of the inclusion of a medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the existing list of debilitating medical conditions contained under the act. All written comment shall adhere to the requirements of Subsection F of this section.
                                               (b)           Public comment: Any member of the general public may testify at the public hearing.  No prior notification is required to present general non-technical statements in support of or in opposition to the petition.  Any such member may also offer exhibits in connection with his testimony, so long as the exhibit is non-technical in nature and not unduly repetitious of the testimony.
               I.             Recording the hearing: Unless the advisory board orders otherwise, the hearing will be audio recorded. Any person, other than the advisory board, desiring a copy of the audio tapes must arrange copying with the medical cannabis program or designee at their own expense.
[7.34.2.10 NMAC – Rp, 7.34.2.10 NMAC, 2/27/2015]
7.34.2.11               ADVISORY BOARD RECOMMENDATION TO THE DEPARTMENT:
               A.            Advisory board recommendation: Upon final determination the advisory board shall provide to the secretary a written report of finding, which recommends either the approval or denial of the petitioner’s request.  The written report of findings shall include a medical justification for the recommendation based upon the individual or collective expertise of the advisory board membership. The medical justification shall delineate between the findings of fact made by the advisory board and scientific conclusions of credible medical evidence.
               B.            Department final determination: The department shall notify the petitioner within 10 days of the secretary’s determination. A denial by the secretary regarding the inclusion of a medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the existing list of debilitating medical conditions contained under the act shall not represent a permanent denial by the department. Any individual or association of individuals may upon good cause re-petition the advisory board. All requests shall present new supporting findings of fact, or scientific conclusions of credible medical evidence not previously examined by the advisory board.
[7.34.2.11 NMAC – Rp, 7.34.2.11 NMAC, 2/27/2015]

Contact Information

Physical Address
1474 Rodeo Rd., Suite 200
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-827-2321 (Phone)
505-476-3025 (Fax)
Mailing Address
Department of Health
Medical Cannabis Program
PO Box 26110
Santa Fe, NM, 87502-6110
Email Address
medical.cannabis@state.nm.us