Medical Cannabis, Hemp, & Legalization: Part 2

An Update On New Mexico House of Representatives Cannabis Legislation
Part Two of Two: Part One Covered All New Mexico Senate Cannabis Legislation
The New Mexico State Legislature is now just about half way thru the legislative session, with 32 days left till the end of the 2017 Session. The legislature has over 1,000 pieces of legislation filed, both chambers have passed about 60 pieces of legislation and the Governor has signed 5 into to law. Do we have another Special Session looming in the fall of 2017?
Policy topics in the legislation that have dominated the session so far; State’s Budget Crisis, Crime & Court Services, Education, and Cannabis Legislation.


We need to pause for a second here as a cannabis community in New Mexico, to have 16 different bills filed in the Roundhouse that are related to cannabis for the 2017 session is a great achievement and start to 2017.  And we owe that to the hard work of the cannabis community in 2016, as the patient community dealt with the horrible card delays last year. The advocacy from last year and how the cannabis community reachout out to lawmakers, putting a spotlight on the MCP issues, has enabled much of this policy we see today. In the 10 year history of the medical cannabis program, the last time cannabis had this much discussion in the Roundhouse, was in 2007 the year the Lynn & Erin Compassionate Use Act became law.  

Political Composition

Democrats won back majority control of the House of Representatives in November 2016 elections, and further consolidated their hold on the Senate. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez is vowing to oppose any tax increases as the lawmakers grapple with a budget shortfall and depleted state reserves.

There are currently 38 Democrats, and 32 Republicans in the House of Representatives. There are currently 26 Democrats, and 16 Republicans in the Senate. The 2018 New Mexico gubernatorial election will take place on November 6, 2018. State Auditor Tim Keller is running for mayor of Albuquerque in 2017. Keller will resign from that job as auditor if he’s elected mayor, elections are to be held on October 3, 2017. Richard J. Berry, the incumbent mayor, will not seek reelection. This will be the first mayoral election in Albuquerque without an incumbent candidate in twenty years.


Some key areas that many lawmakers are not well informed about include; how the medical program actually operates and works- they really have no idea from that very start of the process in seeing a doctor with a MCP application in hand and then thru to the end when the patient gets that card in the mail. And everything in the middle that goes along with being a patient in the program. Right now we are seeing some lawmakers and policy advisors trying to educate all the other lawmakers during committee hearings on cannabis legislation. And so far that has then created more questions and some confusion.

Citizen Lobbying

Citizen lobbying is an essential part of being a medical cannabis advocate and it is the only way elected officials will know how to represent you.


Medical cannabis advocates are not the only people talking with legislators about medical cannabis law and policy. Elected officials are hearing from police organization, medical cannabis opponents, Chamber of Commerce, and members of special interest groups opposed to the use of cannabis even for medical purposes. It is important for all medical cannabis advocates to think about the following questions: ” Without hearing from you, how will your legislator know what is important to you? ” Do you want to trust decisions about access to medical cannabis solely to lobbyists and policymakers?


The point is that you are the patient, the physician, the caregiver, the provider, the lawyer, the nurse, or family member who is affected by medical cannabis laws and policy. You are the voter with the power to hold elected officials accountable for their positions on policy matters. And you are the expert about how these laws and policies affect your daily life. So if you are not talking with you elected officials about medical cannabis, then ask yourself, “Who is?”


Call and email your Senator in your district and call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard.
Senate Chamber main phone 505-986-4714 and general email: senate@nmlegis.gov
Call and email your House of Representative member in your district and call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard. House of Representatives main phone number 505-986-4751 and general email: house@nmlegis.gov.


Contact the Legislative Council Service for general questions about the Legislature.


“Dear New Mexicans and Visitors,
I am committed to listening to your concerns and working to answer your questions.  Therefore, the Constituent Services division within my office has been directed to professionally and efficiently assist in answering your questions and responding to your requests of state government.
My staff is here to serve you and will do everything they can to address your concerns.
Please do not hesitate to call my office at 505-476-2200 to speak with a Constituent Services representative or fill out the form below and we will contact you in a timely manner.
Sincerely, Governor Susana Martinez”

New Mexico House of Representatives Cannabis Legislation for 2017

Now that Senate Bill 6 passed the Senate Chamber and is now to be introduced in the House Chamber and then referred to House Committee’s. It has been scheduled to be heard in the House Agriculture & Water Resources Committee on Thursday, February 16, 2017 – 8:30 A.M. – Room 315. This House Committee has some cannabis supporters and a couple that strongly oppose any cannabis legislation, so committee members here will need some positive and constructive feedback on why Senate Bill 6 should pass and move one. Find the Committee members here to contact.
The bill adds a new section to statute relating to New Mexico Department of Agriculture requiring the department to issue licenses to grow industrial hemp for research and development purposes – including agricultural, agronomic, ecological, processing, sales, and marketing research – pursuant to rules to be promulgated by NMDA. The bill requires an institution of higher education, person, or business that plans to grow industrial hemp seed or industrial hemp fiber to obtain a grower’s license by submitting an application to NMDA.
SB 6 requires New Mexico State University (NMSU) to establish a New Mexico industrial hemp
research and development fund consisting of fees collected by NMDA for industrial hemp
research and development, donations, grants, and income earned from investment of the fund.
Money in the fund does not revert to any other fund at the end of a fiscal year.
SB 6 amends the Controlled Substances Act to amend the definition of “marijuana” to exclude
the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of the plant, whether growing or not, containing a delta-
9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration of no more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.
Finally, SB 6 specifies the enumeration of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinols, or chemical
derivatives thereof as a Schedule I controlled substance does not apply to cultivation of industrial
hemp by qualified entities pursuant to rules adopted by NMDA.
A retired police officer, William “Bill” Rehm has two bills filed that are clearly aimed at bringing harm to the current medical cannabis program participants and the future of cannabis use. Rep. Rehm serves Bernalillo county (District 31) and has been a Representative since 2006.  Rep. Rehm has filed HB-22, “DUI For Certain Drugs & Interlocks”, and a tax bill, HB-102 – “Marijuana Tax Act”.


HB-22, DUI For Certain Drugs & Interlock, is an arbitrary proposal with the use of metabolite concentration to determine DUI for cannabis (THC, dissolves in fat, whereas alcohol dissolves in water). The proposed law states a person would get a DUI, “for the active compound in marijuana, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, five nanograms per milliliter of blood”.  For patients in the state’s medical cannabis program, they would potentially be in jeopardy of DUI even without medicating prior to driving due to residual levels of cannabis in a person’s system. When you drink, alcohol spreads through your saliva and breath. It evenly saturates your lungs and blood. Measuring the volume of alcohol in one part of your body can predictably tell you how much is in any other part of your body. Because THC is fat soluble, it moves readily from water environments, like blood, to fatty environments. Fatty tissues, like the brain, act like sponges for the THC.


Marilyn Huestis, who headed the chemistry and drug metabolism section at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, conducted a study finding that when a smoker’s blood THC level peaks at 13 nanograms per milliliter, that could be just as a dangerous as driving drunk. The marijuana advocacy group NORML emphasizes that driving while over-medicated can be dangerous, and advises people to drive sober.


HB-22, DUI For Certain Drugs & Interlock, current location is the House Consumer & Public Affairs Committee where it has stalled in committee and most likely will not move on. The Committee it is stalled in has 5 members and 3 are very favorable to the medical cannabis program.


HB-102, Marijuana Tax Act is another bill filed by Rep. Rehm that calls for a tax on all cannabis sold in the state with tax funds to go into the state’s medicaid program. The Marijuana Tax Act calls for “an excise tax at the rate of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) per ounce of marijuana distributed” that would be applied to the medical cannabis program. The sad irony here is that the bulk of the medical cannabis program participants are also in the medicaid program, so they will be taxed to raise money for a program the are part of and depend on.  This makes about much sense as taxing people who get meals on wheels delivered to them to raise money for meals on wheels.
HB-102:“Marijuana Tax Act”current location is the House Business & Industry Committee, where it has stalled in committee and most likely will not move on. The Committee it is stalled in has 11 members and 7 have supported patients of the medical cannabis program in the past.


Legalization (blue links go to copy of that state’s legalization law)

State cannabis policy reform surged forward on Nov. 8, 2016, with voters in four states, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada, approving adult-use recreational marijuana, while voters in Arizona disapproved. Eight states and the District of Columbia now have legalized small amounts of marijuana for adult recreational use. Colorado and Washington measures passed in 2012, and Alaska, Oregon and District of Columbia in the fall of 2014.
For the legalization of cannabis, Representatives Bill McCamley and Javier Martinez are sponsoring the Cannabis Revenue & Freedom Act as HB-89 in the House Chamber. Representative McCamley serves in district 33, Doña Ana county, as a Representative since 2013 with an occupation in business outreach and teaching in schools. Representative Javier Martínez serves Bernalillo county (District: 11) working as an Attorney and serving the House since 2015. In the Roundhouse on the House side, Representatives Bill McCamley,  Javier Martinez, and Deborah A. Armstrong- are all strong supporters of the medical cannabis program who want to see it to be protected and improved.


For all New Mexicans our best platform to date for the legalization of cannabis is by Bill McCamley and Javier Martinez as it follows the the legislative process with the sequence of steps required for laws to move through the system, from ideas to formally adopted legislation.


The Cannabis Revenue & Freedom Act as HB-89 current location is the House Business & Industry Committee, where it has stalled in scheduling for the committee to hear the bill. The Committee Chair, Representative Debbie A. Rodella ( District: 41:/County Rio Arriba, Santa Fe and Taos
Service: Representative since 1993/ Email:
debbie.rodella@nmlegis.gov /Capitol Phone: 986-4329 ). Committee Chair Rodella has been critical of the legislation and could use some positive and constructive feedback on why the Cannabis Revenue & Freedom Act deserves to be heard in committee and continue in its legislative process. Statewide it has over 60% support, so one lawmaker shouldn’t stand in the way of the will of the people of New Mexico.
The Cannabis Revenue and Freedom Act, in short will transition the current medical cannabis program into this law. This legislation would establish what is called a Cannabis Control Board that is administratively attached to the Regulation and Licensing Department. The duties of this Cannabis Control Board, that will be made up of 11 members, is to regulate and provide oversight of the medical cannabis program and the social use of marijuana established in the Cannabis Revenue and Freedom Act. The legislation does keep the Department of Health and Medical Cannabis Advisory Board in limited roles.


The Cannabis Revenue and Freedom Act allows for the following :
  • the possession of usable marijuana by a person who is twenty-one years of age or older, if the total of usable marijuana does not exceed: two ounces at the person’s household; or one ounce outside the person’s household
  • the possession of up to seven grams of marijuana extract by a person who is twenty-one years of age or older
  • the production, processing, keeping or storing of homegrown marijuana at a household by one or more persons who are twenty-one years of age or older, if the total of homegrown marijuana at the household does not exceed at any given time: six marijuana plants per person; provided, however that no more than twelve marijuana plants may be present in one household; six immature marijuana plants; and eight ounces of usable marijuana;
  • regulate industrial hemp production and possession and regulate commerce in industrial hemp commodities and products in this state
  • plant count increase structured to: 1000 plants by July 1st 2017 then 2000 by July 1st 2018
  • local Gov’t Authority ( county / city municipality can decide on licenses for both )
  • Taxes: 15% with possible 5% more Municipality tax and another possible 5% county tax



The House of Representatives are showing great interest in hemp with three forms of legislation for hemp.  House Bill 144 is sponsored by Rep. Gomez and is titled, Industrial Hemp Research Rules. Rep. Bealquin “Bill” Gomez represents district 34, south of Las Cruces.  He was first elected to the chamber in 2014 and Gomez currently serves as vice chairman of the Doña Ana County Democratic Party.  This form of legislation would provide the Department of Agriculture authorization to adopt rules for research; including agricultural, agronomic, ecological, processing, sales and marketing research. The bill also provides for the establishment of a research and development fund through New Mexico State University, and allows a person to grow industrial hemp for commercial or research and development purposes; including agricultural, agronomic, ecological, processing, sales and marketing research.


Representative Rick Little is sponsoring HB 154, titled Industrial Hemp Research & Development and also has HB 166, called Exempt Hemp from Controlled Substances. Rep. Little serves district 53 in Doña Ana and Otero counties as a Representative from 2011-2012; Representative since 2015 and his occupation is in construction.


Rep. Little’s hemp bill calls for the establishment of industrial hemp research,  development program and a fund to do so. This legislation would also make hemp exempt from the Controlled Substances Act. “Industrial hemp” would mean; the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of the plant, whether growing or not, containing a delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of no more than three-tenths percent on a dry weight basis. If passed, the board of regents of New Mexico State University through the New Mexico Department of Agriculture would institute and administer an industrial hemp research and development program to permit persons and institutions of higher education to grow industrial hemp for the purpose of studying the growth, cultivation and marketing of industrial hemp in New Mexico.


House Bill 154 also states that the New Mexico Department of Agriculture would issue permits to grow industrial hemp to persons or institutions of higher education and they may grow industrial hemp for the purpose of studying the growth, cultivation or marketing of industrial hemp. No details on the application process or licensure is layout in this bill.

All of the House Hemp bill on Research and Development got combined into one substitute bill that was updated this week. It is now the House Labor & Economic Development Committee Substitute for House Bills 144, 154, and 280. House Labor & Economic Development Committee Substitute can be view here.
In Representative Little’s second hemp bill, Exempt Hemp from Controlled Substances, is an act that would exempt hemp from the definition of “marijuana” under the Controlled Substances Act. Rep. Rick Little (R-Chaparral) introduced House Bill 166 on Jan 18. The legislation would simply remove industrial hemp from the state’s list of controlled substances. This would open the door for a full-scale commercial hemp market in the state by treating it like any other crop for farming.
HB-166 would not require any license to grow hemp, and it would create no state regulatory structure. In short, the state would treat industrial hemp like other plants, such as tomatoes. By ending state prohibition, residents in New Mexico would have an open door to start industrial hemp farming should they be willing to risk violating ongoing federal prohibition.
On Monday February  13th 2017, the House passed HB-166 by a 53-13 vote. It next will be introduced in the Senate Chamber and then scheduled for Senate Committee’s.
For the House of Representatives, this one of the more important pieces of legislation in 2017 for the medical cannabis program and medical cannabis community. Representatives Deborah A. Armstrong and Bill McCamley are sponsoring a Medical Cannabis Research bill, HB 155. A research assessment of physical and pharmacokinetic relationships in cannabis production and consumption in New Mexico hasn’t ever been done in relation to Equivalency in Portion and Dosage for the medical cannabis program. The program has the money to fund it, as the State Auditor last year issued a warning on proper use of program funds after some was put in the general fund that should have stayed in the program.
Rep. Armstrong’s daughter, Erin Armstrong, was a pivotal medical cannabis advocate who suffered from thyroid cancer, and that did not stop Erin, who began to lobby the state legislature to pass a medical cannabis law.  Armstrong, had been a Santa Fe High and UNM graduate, spent three years tirelessly advocating for the medical cannabis program we have today. The Lynn Pierson and Erin Armstrong Compassionate Use Act, 2007 or the LECUA.  Lynn Pierson, was a 26 year old cancer patient,  who brought the value of medical cannabis to the New Mexico legislature. After public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis in 1978 (later renamed The Lynn Pierson Marijuana & Research Act). Rep. Deborah Armstrong represents district 17,  Bernalillo county, she was first elected to the House in 2014 and has a occupation as a consultant. Armstrong had also tried getting a medical cannabis research bill passed in 2015.


The Medical Cannabis Research bill, HB 155, would amend the current medical cannabis program law to provide for the research. This proposal would create a “Cannabis Research Advisory Council”, a research fund and also limit liability for researchers to be able to do this. The “medical cannabis fund” is created in the state treasury. The fund consists of fees collected from the medical cannabis program and by the end of each month, ten percent of the fees collected by the department pursuant to the medical cannabis program during the previous thirty days shall be
transferred to the cannabis research fund.
The “cannabis research advisory council” is created at the Health Sciences Center at the University of New Mexico to provide for research into the production, uses, effects and efficacy of medical cannabis. Members of the council as follows: one qualified patient; one licensed producer; one practitioner; one representative from a laboratory licensed in the state to test medical cannabis; one representative of the department; and any other individual whom the chancellor deems appropriate to advise the health sciences center in matters relating to cannabis research. Members of the council would serve five-year terms and every three years report to the legislative health and human services committee.


The legislative Health and Human Services Committee reported for the Medical Cannabis Research bill with Do Pass recommendation and is awaiting to be schedule in the House Appropriations & Finance Committee.


A new bill that got scheduled on February 14th, 2017 for committee and it is a nasty one aimed to hurt rural access; HB 334 Title “LOCAL APPROVAL OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA LOCATIONS”
Sponsors James G. Townsend (District: 54/ County: Chaves, Eddy and Otero/ Service: Representative since 2015/ Occupation: Ret./Dir. Holly Energy/ Email: townsend@pvtn.net) and Candy Spence Ezzell (District: 58/ County: Chaves/ Service: Representative since 2005/
Occupation: Rancher/ Email: csecows@aol.com) and Bob Wooley (District: 66/ County: Chaves, Lea & Roosevelt/ Service: Representative since 2011/ Occupation: Pipeline Safety Inspector/ Email: bobwooley66@gmail.com)


All of these lawmakers have been very critical of all medical cannabis legislation and could use some positive and constructive feedback on the harm they cause to patients in their districts. Rep. Bob Wooley was solely responsible for killing Rep. Deb Armstrong’s Medical Cannabis Research bill in 2015. If that bill had passed then, the medical program would be in a lot better for patients already. Other states that have done research at academic institutions resulted in those state medical cannabis programs providing more favorable measure for patients.


Current Location of HB-334 is the HOUSE LOCAL GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS, LAND GRANTS & CULTURAL AFFAIRS on 2/16/2017. Things could go either way in this first committee and we need to let the committee members know this bill could be a liable situation for the State of New Mexico as it violates the current law.


“AN ACT
RELATING TO MEDICAL CANNABIS; PROVIDING FOR LOCAL APPROVAL OF
THE PROPOSED LOCATION FOR A LICENSED PRODUCER.”


How To Open The Program Up For More Participants Statewide?

Section 3, Part B of the current LECUA, 2007 law reads as follows:
“debilitating medical condition” means: (1) cancer; (2) glaucoma; (3) multiple sclerosis; (4) damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord, with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity; (5) epilepsy; (6) positive status for human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome; (7) admitted into hospice care in accordance with rules promulgated by the department; or (8) any other medical condition, medical treatment or disease as approved by the department;
New material legislators could add that truly allows the beneficial use of medical cannabis;
WhereAs (8) [could state the following] “ any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health.”  The addition of that language, would open up the medical cannabis program and allow for more participants.
Revisions to licensing requirements for a plant count for patients & producers that would remove the non-psychoactive cannabis and hemp CBD strains by not counting them against patient, caregiver or producer allowable plant counts.
As New Mexico works to define a model for cannabis legalization that protects and improves the state’s medical cannabis program and puts patients first as well, lawmakers have a lot of history to contend with. New Mexico’s medical cannabis history started in 1978 (After public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis). In an Albuquerque Journal poll conducted in October 2016, 61 percent of likely voters said they would support a measure to legalize recreational cannabis for adults age 21 and older.
“New Mexico won’t see people coming across the border like we see with Colorado,” said Richard Anklam, Executive Director of the New Mexico Tax Research Institute. “The sooner we do it (legalization), the more likely we would have an initial positive effect.”
By Jason Barker – Organizer & Medical Cannabis Patient
LECUA Patient’s Coalition Of New Mexico


Appendix A:
Americans For Safe Access Resources for Policy Makers

In This Section

State by State Analysis

headline
This annual report evaluates the array of differing state medical cannabis programs across the country from a perspective often overlooked in policy debates – the patients – and provides policy makers with model legislation and regulations. With dozens of states already seeing legislative and regulatory proposals in 2016, this groundbreaking report will provide state lawmakers with timely tools they need to improve their medical cannabis programs to truly meet the needs of the patients they are meant to serve.

What is the Policy Shop?

headline
Utilizing ASA’s eleven years of experience in implementing medical cannabis laws and our “Legislating Compassion” and “Regulating Compassion” policy tools, ASA staff offer patient advocates and policy makers legislative and regulatory analysis, amendments for legislation and regulations, strategy advice, campaign development and support, and targeted lobbying materials.

Pending State Legislation

headline
Pending State Medical Marijuana Legislation.

Model Legislation

headline
This is ASA’s principles of Legislating Compassion put into legislative form. This template for state-level legislation includes criminal and civil protections for patients. It also allows for personal cultivation and a dispensing center program. Our Dream Bill!

AHPA Industry Standards

headline
Founded in 1982, AHPA is the oldest of the non-profit organizations that specializes in service to the herbal industry. It is the voice of the herbal products industry and the recognized leader in representing the botanical trade. With more than 300 members, AHPA’s membership represents the finest growers, processors, manufacturers, and marketers of botanical and herbal products.

Guide to Regulating Industry Standards

headline
ASA has created the Patients Focused Certification (PFC) program. PFC is a non-profit, third party certification program for the medical cannabis industry and the nation’s only certification program for the AHPA and AHP standards. PFC is available to all qualifying companies cultivating, manufacturing, or distributing medical cannabis products, as well as to laboratories providing medical cannabis analytic services. PFC offers a comprehensive program that includes employee training, compliance inspections, ongoing monitoring, regulatory updates and an independent complaint process for consumers.

ASA’s Analysis and Public Comment

headline
Over the years ASA has weighed in on state and local legislation and regulations. Look in this section to see if ASA has already responded to legislative proposals in your area.

Reports

headline
ASA conducts and compiles research on issues affecting medical cannabis patients across the country.

ASA Policy Positions

headline
Learn about ASA’s policy position on medical cannabis


Appendix B:
TABLE 1. STATE MEDICAL CANNABIS PROGRAM LAWS


State
Statutory Language (year)
Patient Registry or ID cards
Allows Dispensaries
Specifies Conditions
Recognizes Patients from other states
State Allows for Retail Sales/Adult Use
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, for AZ-approved conditions, but not for dispensary purchases.
Not yet fully operational/regulated production or sales.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Arkansas
Issue 6 (2016) Details pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Proposition 215 (1996)  SB 420 (2003)
Yes
Yes (cooperatives and collectives)
No
No
Proposition 64 (2016)
Colorado
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
HB 5387 (2012)
Yes
Yes
Yes
SB 17 (2011)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes, for DE-approved conditions.
Initiative 59 (1998)  L18-0210 (2010)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Florida
Amendment 2 (2016) Details pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Approved in Nov. 2014, not yet operational.
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Draft rules released in July 2015
SB 862 (2000)
Yes
No
Yes
No
HB 1 (2013) Eff. 1/1/2014
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Question 2 (1999)  LD 611 (2002)  
Question 5 (2009)   LD 1811 (2010)
LD 1296 (2011)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes, but not for dispensary purchases.
Question 1 (2016)
HB 702 (2003) SB 308 (2011) HB 180/SB 580 (2013)  HB 1101- Chapter 403 (2013)
SB 923 (signed 4/14/14)
HB 881- similar to SB 923
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Question 3 (2012)
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Question 4 (2016)
Yes
Not in state law, but localities may create ordinances to allow them and regulate them.
Yes
Yes, for legal protection of posession, but not for dispensary purchases.
SF 2471, Chapter 311 (2014)
Yes
Yes, limited, liquid extract products only
Yes
No
Initiative 148 (2004) SB 423 (2011)
Initiative 182 (2016)
Yes

New details pending
No**
New details pending
Yes
New details pending
No
New details pending
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, if the other state’s program are “substantially similar.” Patients must fill out Nevada paperwork.
Question 2 (2016)
HB 573 (2013)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes, with a note from their home state, but they cannot purchase through dispensaries.
SB 119 (2009)  
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
SB 523 (2007)
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
A6357 (2014) Signed by governor 7/5/14
Yes
Ingested doses may not contain more than 10 mg of THC, product may not be combusted (smoked).
Yes
No
North Dakota
Measure 5 (2016) Details pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Pending
Ohio
HB 523 (2016) Approved by legislature, signed by governor 6/8/16, not yet operational
Yes
SB 161 (2007)
Yes
No
Yes
No
Measure 91 (2014)
SB 3 (2016) Signed by governor 4/17/16 Not yet operational
Yes
Yes
Yes
Puerto Rico
Public Health Department Regulation 155 (2016) Not yet operational
Cannot be smoked
SB 791 (2007)  SB 185 (2009)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
SB 76 (2004) SB 7 (2007) SB 17 (2011)
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
SB 5073 (2011)
No
Yes, approved as of Nov. 2012, stores opened in July, 2014.
Yes
No
FAQ about WA cannabis laws by the Seattle Times.


Lynn & Erin Compassionate Use Act Patient’s Coalition of New Mexico ~ A GrassRoots Movement!
UNITE-NETWORK-GROW-INFORM-KNOW-EDUCATE-ACTIVISM-VOTE-HEALTH-WELLNESS

(All Rights Reserved 04/20/2016)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s